Category Archives: Art

An astounding bouquet

KKSgb2950/30 KKSgb2951/101 KKSgb2951/125KKSgb2948/60KKSgb2948/64KKSgb2948/62

Hans Simon Holtzbecker was commissioned over a decade to produce paintings for Duke Frederic III of Schleswig-Holstein-Gottorf in 1649 of the beautiful plants and flowers in the gardens at Gottorf’s castle.  What we have now is a wonderful restoration project that allows us the opportunity to see the four volumes of work.

There are 365 pages detailing 1180 illustrations and they have been restored by the conservators at SMK,the National Gallery of Denmark. What an absolute joy!  And a definite candidate for my next project, there will definitely be one of my hand made books showing off these beauties. I think I may decide to show the illustrations as they appear  – unadorned by any text.  Normally I am inclined to complement either text such as one of Eliot’s poems with illustration, or illustration with complementary poetry or quotation.  This volume may simply be a small tribute to the Gottofer Codex and simply be a number of selected pages from it. Sometimes less is more.

For more information on the restoration project and the Gottofer Codex, here is a link that should take you there.

http://www.smk.dk/en/visit-the-museum/exhibitions/past-exhibitions/2013/flowers-and-world-views/whats-on/an-old-treasure-is-restored/

Beginning and End

butterfly for soc 62

What we call the beginning is often the end
And to make and end is to make a beginning.
The end is where we start from. And every phrase
And sentence that is right (where every word is at home,
Taking its place to support the others,
The word neither diffident nor ostentatious,
An easy commerce of the old and the new,
The common word exact without vulgarity,
The formal word precise but not pedantic,
The complete consort dancing together)
Every phrase and every sentence is an end and a beginning,
Every poem an epitaph. And any action
Is a step to the block, to the fire, down the sea’s throat
Or to an illegible stone: and that is where we start.
We die with the dying:
See, they depart, and we go with them.
We are born with the dead:
See, they return, and bring us with them.
The moment of the rose and the moment of the yew-tree
Are of equal duration. A people without history
Is not redeemed from time, for history is a pattern
Of timeless moments. So, while the light fails
On a winter’s afternoon, in a secluded chapel
History is now and England.

With the drawing of this Love and the voice of this Calling

We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.
Through the unknown, unremembered gate
When the last of earth left to discover
Is that which was the beginning;
At the source of the longest river
The voice of the hidden waterfall
And the children in the apple-tree

From ‘The Little Gidding ‘ , the last of T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets.

Image Deborah Anne Corr-   Please do not copy without permission

Life’s Rich Tapestry

8750051_15418925_lz

I do not know which to prefer,
The beauty of inflections
Or the beauty of innuendoes,
The blackbird whistling
Or just after.

from Wallace Stevens poem, ’13 ways of looking at at Blackbird’

Image Digital Painting by Anne Corr , Attenborough Nature Reserve

Shadows

In the Shadows

This is a digital painting I was working on yesterday, and it uses detail from a painting of the 19th century, by Martinus Rorbye on view at the National Gallery of Denmark, and online here

http://www.smk.dk/en/explore-the-art/highlights/martinus-roerbye-view-from-the-artists-window/

If you view the original painting, you will see the artist has painted a view of Copenhagen harbour from the window, which I have eliminated, as well as other internal detail of the room from his parent’s house.

The original painting displays the artists position of viewing a horizon full of opportunity and new experience.  He is looking out from a very comfortable position and seeing only possibility, ships to take him away and a safe harbour of the delightful room to return to.  There are no shadows.

My feelings are much more trepidatory at the moment. I have the comfort of a secure position, but the view I look out on is more blank – it has no ships sailing in it, the expanse is unwritten.  Inside the room there are the tended plants that are blooming, having been nurtured, and the book is open on the table, still being examined.  But the shadows are there too, they are close and dark, as real as the view, as experienced as the comfort.

This then is a more accurate picture of my view, and I am grateful to the National Gallery of Denmark for sharing their treasure and allowing the use of the material to be reshaped and made into something new and different to share.

Here is a statement from the website that explains the use of Public Domain images

Here you can find information on how you can use images of Public Domain artworks in the SMK collection.

Statens Museum for Kunst is Denmark’s National Gallery and main museum of art.  The collections span 700 years of art history, presenting works from Denmark, Europe, and the rest of the world. A large share of these collections are in the public domain. They are part of our shared cultural heritage and have been around for so long that they are completely free of any copyright restrictions. This means that you have the right to:

Share the images – i.e. to copy, distribute, and transmit them.

  • Remix the images – i.e. modify and reuse them in new contexts.
  • Use the images in any context – e.g. teaching, research, lectures, publications, film productions, etc. This includes commercial purposes

I feel so lucky to be in an age of enlightenment!

Art imitating Life

Art imitating LifeI loved collaging this together – I couldn’t get out of my mind the conundrum of art imitating life, or life imitating art, which is the right way round?    So off I went and mashed together a lovely lady from William van Kooi’s ‘The Love Letter’, with a room from Jacobus Cornet, added a side table and a pot of flowers (Manet).  I made the lady in the room less lifelike than the portrait of her on the wall, just to underline the point!

All the originals can be viewed in their full glory at the Rijks, but my digital collage is viewable on the Society 6 site.